Multiple symbol definitions


I found a way to allow multiple symbol definitions in a static library assembled from a bunch of object (.o) files. The secret sauce is adding “-z muldefs” to the g++ command line. I’m not sure what it tickles in the linker but it made my pains go away. One of these days I’ll spend a weekend playing with “ld” to see what other magic I can come up with.

OpenFrameworks – Where are the XCode projects???


I’ve been toying with Kinect hacks lately which led to my exploring OpenFrameworks. I had a copy on my hard drive from last year when I initially started toying, so today I thought I’d try to pull the latest from git and tinker a bit. I was surprised to learn that there where no Xcode projects for any of the example apps. After stumbling around a bit I found a post in the forum that reveals how you have to build and run the _DeployExamples located at: apps/devApps/_DeployExamples/deployExamples.xcodeproj. If you’re as surprised as I was then hopefully this will clear things for you. Also, note that the default scheme in the Xcode projects happens to be the library. This means that simply pressing the run button won’t do much aside from building the library. You have to manually select the “.app” scheme from the scheme selection drop down if you want any of the projects to do anything. My first attempt at running the “_DeployExamples” app left me puzzled for this very reason. After selecting the application scheme from the scheme selector THEN pressing the run button, I was able to see the app running.

JNI, C++, Idea, and Netbeans looks good


I’ve been trying to get comfortable with C++. I’m finding quite a few native libraries that I need to talk to… programmatically. So I tried GEdit. Then I moved on to Windows and Eclipse. Everytime I want to install an Eclipse plugin I somehow find it easier to just grab an Eclipse bundle. (Plugin conflicts can burn so much clock.) Grabbing the Eclipse CDT, I found myself accidentally expanding and overwriting my Blackberry Eclipse install. (I always expand to C:\eclipse, it’s just a habit.) Frustrated, I decided to boot back into Linux and try Idea. I tried out the C++ plugin under Idea and had some minor trouble because there’s no documentation on it. I then tried KDevelop. Then something came over me. I decided to try out Netbeans. Netbeans…

Once upon a time there was an IDE I kinda liked. It was Forte (based on Netbeans). That was my first Netbeansy experience. Back then I was satisfied but then I found Eclipse and later got hooked on Idea. Netbeans was something I always toyed with here and there. I liked it but it lacked the refactoring support in Idea. Still it was kinda cool.

Fast forward a couple of years and now I’m all about Eclipse and Idea. I use Eclipse only because others force it on me. RIM tools are built for it, most people in my company swear by it. Every time I need to do something slightly different there seems to be an Eclipse bundle for that. It’s pretty full featured only falling behind Idea in a couple of spots. It’s just a pain to configure/setup. Idea has always been my tool of choice. If I could write ObjC in Idea I’d pitch XCode in a minute.

Today I tried Netbeans for the first time since it turned 5. I almost fell out my chair when I instinctively hit Alt+Enter to fix a syntax error. It worked! Just like Idea! Then I started looking at the right click and refactoring menus. I got really happy! Netbeans is now starting to feel like Idea felt back in the day. To be honest, Idea has been giving me lots of trouble these days with plugin “Blame this plugin” error pop-ups and the AWT_TOOLKIT thing that causes the text area to become uneditable. Overall Netbeans is looking much improved! I am totally impressed… I want to write more about both, my experience with Netbeans and my use of the C++ plugin under Idea.